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Bio

Katelyn Delvaux's poetry has appeared in such publications as formercactus, Split Lip, Menacing Hedge, and Slice. She currently lives in St. Louis, Missouri where she teaches composition and literature. In between grading, she also serves on the poetry staff for Rivet. Katelyn's poems have received multiple nominations for Best of the Net and Pushcart prizes, while her scholarly work has earned her fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Poetry Foundation. 

Katelyn grew up a military brat with shallow roots and perpetually the new kid. Before landing in academia she was an EKG technician, massage therapist, and even a blackjack dealer. Her interests are just as varied as her professions, including board games, bingo, urban legends, folk lore, moral psychology, refinishing furniture, and all things pop culture. 

 
 
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"Delvaux hones her students’ critical thinking and writing skills with a mix of esoteric references and popular culture. She’s not afraid to fuse the 18th-century French artist Joseph Ducreux with memes and rap lyrics or analyze James Oppenheim’s union song “Bread and Roses” while referencing “Orange is the New Black.” As a result of her enthusiasm and efforts in the classroom, Delvaux has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute Fellowship"


"I’m sure my cohorts are tired of reading this from me in comments on submissions, but Rivet should be electrifying. It should be a jolt, a shot, all those things terrible gum commercials promise but never deliver. Each submission should give you a little shiver."


"Too often we flip through a journal and dog ear the poems we like, scoff at the ones we don’t, but how often do you stop and think of the life and experience that gave way to that particular piece of writing? Not just the authors, but the staff that saw themselves in those words. Working on mojo for the last three years has left me with a stronger sense of the people involved in this process, and now I can’t help but see faces on pages."